No ability to ‘see the light’ or honestly analyze SAT math test scores from Gilroy High School

DEAR EDITOR:
Revisionist history is used by those who are wrong beyond a
reasonable doubt. Cynthia Walker is guilty of revisionist
history.
DEAR EDITOR:

Revisionist history is used by those who are wrong beyond a reasonable doubt. Cynthia Walker is guilty of revisionist history.

On May 21, regarding my objections to SAT data breaking many of the tenets of statistics, Ms. Walker wrote, “This statement is absurd. Statistics is the science of assembling, classifying, and tabulating data, whether said data be AP scores [or] SAT scores. With statistics, one can find a percentile, for an individual student, for a class, for a school, or for a district. One can compare one district to another.”

Reading the piece from May 21 leaves no doubt. Ms Walker intended SAT scores to be a stand alone measure. In my last letter, I used The College Board to demonstrate that Ms. Walker was clueless in the use of SAT data. Does Ms. Walker admit her mistake? No, she revises history.

On May 28, Ms. Walker tried to save face by quoting The College Board’s proper use for SAT data. She then writes, “I thought that Dispatch columnist and staff writer were doing exactly that?” The short answer to that question is “No.”

Ms. Walker and others have yet to demonstrate they see the light. This can be verified from past articles by looking for multiple measures in one article. Non-school indicators should also be considered while reading these articles. There are a few but not many uses of multiple measures. Reporter Lori Stuenkel’s use of data has improved greatly; others still have a long way to go.

Ms. Walker’s insistence that Saxton is a great math series brings us full circle to what started the exchanges with her. We have plenty of math openings. Apply. Get hired. Convince the math department and school board that you can pilot the series and have a ball. Show me how it’s done. Show me the practical application of your educational knowledge.

Ms. Walker insists that she knows everything when she knows little or nothing. When demonstrated to be wrong, she revises her story. She insists upon having her way.

The fact that Ms. Walker views herself as a player in reform after attacking a respected teacher out of ignorance and refusing to admit her mistake smells like delusions of grandeur to me.

Ms. Walker wants parents to know what kind of person teachers their children. They know – a knowledgeable one who cares.

Wayne Scott, GHS math teacher

Submitted Tuesday, June 1 to [email protected]

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