Weekly stargazing tips 1.4

January 4 Venus and Mercury
The planets Venus and Mercury huddle together in the morning
twilight. They are so low in the sky that you need binoculars to
pick them out.
January 4 Venus and Mercury

The planets Venus and Mercury huddle together in the morning twilight. They are so low in the sky that you need binoculars to pick them out. Venus is the brighter of the two, with Mercury to its upper right by about the width of a finger held at arm’s length.

January 5 Moon and Planets

Look for the planet Jupiter, which looks like a brilliant star, standing about halfway up the southern sky at first light tomorrow. The crescent Moon is far to the southeast of Jupiter. It lines up to the upper right of Mars and its “rival,” the star Antares.

January 6 Moon, Mars, and Antares

The planet Mars and the stars Antares are low in the southeast at first light tomorrow, teaming up with the crescent Moon. Mars looks like an orange star just to the left of the Moon. Antares, a true star, is about the same distance to the Moon’s lower left.

January 7 Sirius and Procyon

A pair of “dog stars” chases each other across winter’s night sky. The brighter star is Sirius, in the constellation Canis Major, the big dog. The other is Procyon, of the little dog. Sirius rises in the east-southeast in early evening, with Procyon well to its left.

January 8 Auriga

Auriga, the charioteer, rides high across winter’s evening skies. To find it, look for its brightest star, Capella, which stands high overhead around 10 or 11 p.m. Capella is one of the brightest stars in the night sky, and shines pale yellow.

January 9 Capella

A star system known as Capella stands high overhead this evening. Its main components are two giant stars that are closer together than Earth is to the Sun. Their light blurs together into a single point, forming one of the brightest stars in the night sky.

January 10 Moon at Perigee

The Moon is at perigee today, which is its closest point to Earth for its current orbit. This month, perigee occurs on the same day as new Moon. The new Moon will produce higher-than-average tides.

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