Doesn’t understand the Gilroy chamber’s decision

A lot has been written on these pages recently about the Gilroy
Chamber of Commerce.
I have recently decided to join the Chamber, and I have no doubt
that its membership includes people of various backgrounds, beliefs
and political ideologies.
A lot has been written on these pages recently about the Gilroy Chamber of Commerce.

I have recently decided to join the Chamber, and I have no doubt that its membership includes people of various backgrounds, beliefs and political ideologies. I am hopeful that there is room in the Chamber for everyone who does business in Gilroy.

That being said, it is disappointing to me that we have in Gilroy two chambers; the Gilroy Chamber of Commerce and the Hispanic Chamber of Commerce. I’m not sure why there needs to be a separate Chamber of Commerce for Hispanic business people, but perhaps these businesses don’t feel that the Gilroy Chamber represents their interests.

Last week, the Gilroy Chamber of Commerce Government Relations Committee had an opportunity to give a voice to the Hispanic Chamber.

A motion was made to invite a member of the Hispanic Chamber to sit on the Gilroy Chamber Political Endorsement Committee. By a vote of 6-3, the motion was defeated.

I have no idea why two-thirds of the Government Relations Committee didn’t feel that a member of the Hispanic Chamber would be a welcome addition when considering political endorsements.

Gilroy’s population is 53 percent Hispanic; this fact alone should have spurred the Government Relations Committee to welcome a Hispanic Chamber member with open arms. Dismissing a voice for half of the population of Gilroy could not be good for any business.

On the national front, the Supreme Court this week heard arguments concerning the public display of the Ten Commandments. A decision is expected this summer. I am on record as opposed to religious displays in public places.

In order to get around the fact that the Ten Commandments is most closely associated with theology, some savvy lawyers are now arguing that the Ten Commandments should be allowed to be posted up in courts and post offices and schools on the basis of their historical significance in the establishment of our country.

I see where this is going and I am not pleased. This path can only end badly. In an ongoing effort to meet the religious right halfway, I have a few suggestions.

Perhaps we should not post the Ten Commandments in their entirety in public places, but instead post appropriate commandments where they may have the greatest impact.

“Thou shalt not steal” could be emblazoned across the shopping center signs on Pacheco Pass and at the Outlet stores. “Thou shalt not take the Lord’s name in vain” could be worked into the dashboard of automobiles; I know that this is a reminder I need from time to time while driving. The IRS could print this admonition right above the address label on the 1040 forms.

“Thou shalt not covet thy neighbors goods” could be strategically positioned on all advertisements for The Sharper Image.

“Thou shalt not commit adultery” could be posted on bar signs, right under the karaoke advertisements.

Health clubs could do a real community service by posting “Thou shalt not covet thy neighbors wife” on men’s lockers.

“Thou shalt not kill” could be placed on guns and bullets. We could also satisfy the left and the right by putting the same messages prominently positioned on death row and at abortion clinics. A little something for everyone – now that’s the American way.

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