Pinks bring spicy scent to the garden

Pinks

Pinks, one of the many members of the Dianthus family, never
seem to fail to please with their bright colors and unusually spicy
scent. While pinks seem to have been forgotten for a time when
their cousins, the carnations, held attention, their unique
fragrance stirs memories of past pleasures.
Pinks, one of the many members of the Dianthus family, never seem to fail to please with their bright colors and unusually spicy scent. While pinks seem to have been forgotten for a time when their cousins, the carnations, held attention, their unique fragrance stirs memories of past pleasures.

The pink, which closely resembles the carnation, can be found in seed or plant form, and either works well. All of the dianthus have certain requirements in common. They like the sun, good drainage and non-acid soil. They will all do splendidly in rock gardens and other, perhaps, hard to plant areas. Their beauty is appreciated as the flowers appear from late spring on into the early fall.

Pinching out the tip growth as they develop just as we do with chrysanthemums will help the pinks have more blooms and be a more compact plant. Another help is to fertilize with a flower type fertilizer that is low on nitrogen.

As dianthus are not fond of wet spots, they are easy to plant in those sunny, dry area of the garden. The need for air about the plant eliminates mulching, and do not allow the soil to accumulate around the base of the plant either. When planting newly purchased plants, be sure to maintain the soil at the exact height or slightly less than you observe in the nursery container.

Pinks can be found growing in alpine areas as well as having been one of the most popular plants in English cottage gardens. Their flowers can vary from single to double but most pinks are double. The edges of the petals are fluted and the stems can certainly be cut for a lovely addition to a floral bouquet. Every man enjoys a flower in the lapel as a boutonniere.

Other members of the Dianthus family include the carnation, sweet William, garden or border pinks, rainbow or Indian pinks as well as some alpine and rock garden hybrids. Check them out today at your local nursery.

– The California Association

of Nurseries and Garden Centers

Leave your comments