Having sand in new parks apparently makes too much common sense for Gilroy

Dear Editor,
I was very surprised to read that there was discussion at a
meeting that the five new city playgrounds will not have sand,
but

tan bark.

Who says that

tan bark

is ADA compliant? I think that the community needs clarification
on what type of

tan bark

is going into the new parks.
Dear Editor,

I was very surprised to read that there was discussion at a meeting that the five new city playgrounds will not have sand, but “tan bark.”

Who says that “tan bark” is ADA compliant? I think that the community needs clarification on what type of “tan bark” is going into the new parks. “Tan bark,” as I remember, was used 20 years ago, and as I remember it causes splinters. Why change a good thing (sand) to something that is useless to our children. What is the reason for eliminating sand? Is it because it costs more than “tan bark?” Is it being vandalized with broken bottles, garbage? Whatever the reason, it sure would be nice to know.

When I take my children to the park the main reason is to play in the sand and to build sand castles. I have yet to see toys for “tan bark” and for that matter try building a “tan bark” castle.

I did some research on “tan bark” and found that there are different types. For example, I have found that actual “tan bark” is not being used in parks anymore, that the new product being used is called several different names (playground fiber, treated fiber or even wood fiber). The difference between “tan bark” and the listed products is that the listed products do not have splinters, and is ADA approved and is milled to spec’s for playgrounds. And, most importantly, it absorbs the fall of children very well. If you have not seen (playground fiber, treated fiber or wood fiber) go visit Christmas Hill Park. This park has the product I’m referring to. Other research that I have done includes, what is the cost difference between sand and “tan bark?” by contacting other city’s about their parks and businesses who install playgrounds.

Eliminating sand from the parks is a very big mistake. Young children enjoy going to the park to play in the sand, so please reconsider having sand in ALL the new parks. To the person who is making the decisions on our parks, I ask: Do you have small children? If so, ask them what they prefer to play in. If you don’t, then think about the parents who do have children and visit the parks to play in the SAND.

Kim Sullivan, Gilroy

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