82?… whew

Gavilan College student Melonie Miller, from Tres Pinos, takes

Gilroy
– Unusually warm weather drew out a number of residents
Thursday, both to enjoy the near-record temperatures and to find
ways to cool down.
Kindergartners on the Iron Birds Tee-ball team were out
practicing at Christmas Hill Park, while the older kids took turns
hitting on the softball field.
Gilroy – Unusually warm weather drew out a number of residents Thursday, both to enjoy the near-record temperatures and to find ways to cool down.

Kindergartners on the Iron Birds Tee-ball team were out practicing at Christmas Hill Park, while the older kids took turns hitting on the softball field.

Darlene Birrell, whose son plays for the Iron Birds, had no qualms with the warm weather.

“It’s so nice to get out,” she said. “The beach is just too far.”

The rest of the day’s agenda for Birrell and a fellow parent included haircuts for the kids and ice cream.

Others had similar plans, but different reasons.

“It’s a little too hot, too early,” said Rhonda Hurst, as she waited for a frozen fruit drink at Jamba Juice in the Pacheco Pass shopping center.

Manager John Stanko said more than 150 customers came in by late afternoon.

“We always do better on hot days,” he said. “Rain and Jamba don’t go well together. Sunshine and Jamba are a great marriage.”

The unusually warm weather is a result of continental winds from the northeast, according to Rick Canepa, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service.

“Our temperatures are running above normal, no question about that,” he said. In Gilroy, the temperature reached 82 degrees on Thursday, but fell short of last year’s record high of 85 degrees.

Canepa predicted another round of sun and above normal temperatures for today, with the possibility of record highs. The weekend promises temperatures in the 70s, and possibly in the 80-degree range.

“High pressure setting up over the Great Basin is causing the air to flow down over the Sierra Nevada mountains to the coastal ranges and down to the beaches,” Canepa explained. “When the air sinks like that it causes it to warm up and dry out. That produces a combination of clear skies and normal temperatures. And it’s flirting with record temperatures.”

The cold weather South Valley residents were getting used to in recent weeks is the more common trend for this time of year, due to the maritime influence and northwest winds, which usher in cooler air. That northwest influence will kick in again early next week, when temperatures are expected to drop off by five to seven degrees.

“We’re not looking at any record highs next week,” Canepa said.

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