The price of pranks: Are they worth the laughs?

The price of pranks: Are they worth the laughs?

By Carly Kennedy
Remember how much fun April Fool’s Day use to be? Sitting in
your room, trying to devise a clever plan to out-prank your
friends? The salt shaker top left loose, the honey in the shampoo.
Weren’t those good times?
By Carly Kennedy

Remember how much fun April Fool’s Day use to be? Sitting in your room, trying to devise a clever plan to out-prank your friends? The salt shaker top left loose, the honey in the shampoo. Weren’t those good times?

Today, some students plan pranks on a much larger scale; many of which are focused on school.

“Pulling pranks at school is just more fun,” explains a student at Gilroy High. Unfortunately for these pranksters, many school districts have adopted “zero-tolerance policies.”

“Zero-tolerance policies state that students who commit serious offenses will receive suspension or expulsion,” explains Robert Bravo, principal of Gilroy High School.

Is a zero-tolerance policy overkill when applied to innocent pranks?

“The school should have a sense of humor,” says Annie Cockerill, a sophomore at GHS. “How is the school day supposed to be interesting if it all goes to plan? Pranks just keep everyone laughing.”

Probably the most anticipated gag comes at the end of the year, when seniors who have been planning their prank for years get the opportunity to pull it off. Past pranks have included door locks glued shut, graduation years spray painted all over the school, and even fish guts in the ventilation system.

What sort of consequences would come from pulling a senior prank?

“Consequences could include arrest by the police, having to pay for damage done and suspension or expulsion,” explains Bravo.

“The zero-tolerance policy should not apply for the senior prank,” says Stefon McCrimon, a GHS junior. “They”re seniors, let them enjoy it! But I understand that they should not take it too far.”

Most students believe that pulling a prank is just an innocent way to escape from the dullness of just another day at school.

“Any sort of event that pulls everyone out of a boring routine shouldn’t be punished so harshly,” says Cockerill. “Maybe the pranksters should receive multiple detentions or a suspension, but not expulsion.”

Administrators don’t consider crimes done to the school “funny pranks” – they are considered major offenses and are dealt with accordingly.

“While some people might call these pranks, I would call it vandalism,” explains Bravo. “When we have to pay money to repair vandalism, that means less money for school supplies, books, etc. – and that’s not fair to other students.”

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