Have a Safe Halloween

Halloween, my favorite holiday of the year, is nearly here. Soon
little ghosts and goblins will be overtaking their neighborhoods,
scaring up sweet treats while masquerading as their favorite
superheroes, princesses and monsters.
Halloween, my favorite holiday of the year, is nearly here. Soon little ghosts and goblins will be overtaking their neighborhoods, scaring up sweet treats while masquerading as their favorite superheroes, princesses and monsters.

The holiday is certainly a time for fun, but also a time for parents and kids to be on guard for safety

hazards. The American Red Cross recommends that trick-or-treaters stick to sidewalks and cross streets only at corners, and wear light-colored or reflective clothing to make themselves more visible.

Keep away from open flames and candles, too, the organization advised. Most store-bought costumes –

especially those made of synthetic materials such as plastic or acetate – are flammable.

Masks are a troublesome problem, too. They restrict vision, so the wearers may end up tripping more easily or exposing themselves to other dangers, such as cars. Facial makeup is a better idea, according to the

American College of Emergency Physicians, but most Halloween paint and makeup isn’t meant for wearing in close proximity to the eyes, no matter what the packaging says or shows. The applied makeup should by removed before bed as directed by the package labeling.

ACEP physicians also recommend that kids trick-or-treat not door to door, but at community events held by churches, shopping malls and other groups. If your kids do go out for the evening, it’s best to have anadult along, or at least an agreed-upon route.

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