Condescending Words from Teacher Stunning to ‘We Lowly Serfs’

Dear Editor,
As a Gilroy expatriate now living in the Rocky Mountains, I look
forward to my occasional visits home via surfing waves to the
Dispatch on my WWW Longboard.
Dear Editor,

As a Gilroy expatriate now living in the Rocky Mountains, I look forward to my occasional visits home via surfing waves to the Dispatch on my WWW Longboard. Today’s visit had me chuckling about the condescending defense by Lynell Broadstone of her position against California Proposition 74. I am not sure which was more striking, the look-down-your-nose reference to paltry probationary periods that us folks in lesser societal positions experience, or the challenge to the proletariat class to just try to do her job for one week to see how much more valuable her skills are.

It is amazing that an educated, thinking individual would present such a demeaning argument and then expect sympathy from us for her having to serve a new probationary period should she become the hire of a new employer.

We serfs face that at every turn. Remaining in the same industry while changing employers is irrelevant; those of us in the lower echelons must still and always prove our mettle to earn our security. Issues such as prior employment and seniority mean little should we fail to deliver in the present.

Why would anybody in the marketplace expect anything different?

Despite what Ms. Broadstone would have us believe, terminating an ineffective tenured instructor is not the cakewalk she describes, especially in light of the power and influence the unions bring to bear on such administrative issues.

Proposition 74 is simply a return to longer evaluation periods that were abandoned by California in the mid-1980’s. It is a return to reason that acknowledges the conflict between the tenured security of ineffective teachers and a commitment to the success and well-being of students. It is a concluding salvo in the battle between demands for privilege by the unions and the reality of human nature and the marketplace, an accession to the assertion that an employment structure that elevates the producer over the product is flawed at its core. Experience has taught us well.

Perhaps, at its center, Ms Broadstone’s opposition to Proposition 74 exists because of a sense that, in some way, teachers do deserve special treatment. Unfortunately, this special treatment afforded them since the mid-1980’s created expensive problems for California schools and served to handicap many students by creating protections for good teachers that end up harboring the ineffective as well. This proposition seeks to replace the teacher’s claim to an unreasonable level of job security with what is best for the student. Not a novel concept but a welcome return to sanity and reason.

Robert Wise, Colorado Springs

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