Violent Crime Down Statewide, But Vehicle Thefts Are on The Rise

Violent crime is down across the state and even lower in Santa
Clara County. The 2004 Crime in California report released Monday
by Attorney General Bill Lockyer showed that the violent crime rate
is at its lowest since 1972.
Gilroy – Violent crime is down across the state and even lower in Santa Clara County. The 2004 Crime in California report released Monday by Attorney General Bill Lockyer showed that the violent crime rate is at its lowest since 1972.

Santa Clara County fared better in lowering the violent crime than the state by dropping 5.9 percent. The homicide rate is down 25 percent from 48 murders in 2003 to 37 in 2004.

“I am pleased to see another year of decreases in violent crime,” Lockyer said in a release.

He attributes the drop to the efforts by law enforcement officials.

Since 1992 when the violent crime rate peaked at 1,103.9 per 100,000 people, it has been on the decline and nearly halved in 12 years.

However, while the streets may be safer for you – they’re not for your car.

Motor vehicle thefts have increased statewide.

But in Santa Clara County the rate increase was more than six times the state’s at 20.4 percent.

Typically in the winter months the number of auto thefts increase as individuals warm up their cars in the driveways, leaving the keys in the ignition – a temptation a thief may not refuse.

Misdemeanor arrests showed an interesting pattern forming in Santa Clara County.

For the third consecutive year the female misdemeanor arrest rate has increased.

Nationally, more women are heading to prison than ever before and are the make up the inmate population’s fastest-growing segment.

However, the number of females arrested for committing felony crimes dropped in 2004 after a jump in 2003.

At first glance, drug statistics indicated promising news.

Less arrests were made for marijuana possession in more than a decade, but the arrest rate for other drugs is at its highest since 1997.

There is still more work to be done.

“The Department of Justice will continue to work with the law enforcement community to provide the tools necessary to ensure that our goals are met,” Lockyer said.

Leave your comments