Judge Grants Delay in Case of Accused Extortionists

A judge deferred the case of two Gilroyans accused of extorting
a motorcycle and motorcycle parts totaling $150,000 from
Indian-Victory Motorcycles and reselling them on eBay.
Gilroy – A judge deferred the case of two Gilroyans accused of extorting a motorcycle and motorcycle parts totaling $150,000 from Indian-Victory Motorcycles and reselling them on eBay.

Vanessa Bullock, 43, and James Collier, 48, waived their rights to speedy trial and a preliminary hearing within 10 days at the South County Courthouse in San Martin Tuesday afternoon. The hearing was postponed to Nov. 2 because the courtroom and judge were tied up with another trial.

The Gilroyans were arrested and charged in July with buying, receiving, concealing or withholding motorcycle parts and buying or receiving a stolen Indian Sprint motorcycle. Bullock, who shared a home on the 7400 block of Dowdy Street with Collier, was also charged with extorting $23,000 from an Indian-Victory employee and threatening him at least three times between March and July with a handgun and retribution by her fellow gang members.

Bullock, still in custody, appeared in a prison jumpsuit and hid from cameras behind her attorney. Collier, sporting a black ponytail, black moustache and beard, came dressed in black shoes, dark blue pants and a black T-shirt with his name on the back. Out on bail, Collier milled about in the lobby before the hearing, making small talk about motorcycles with a sheriff’s deputy.

Collier was more respectful in court – using “sir” to finish his sentences – than his last court appearance, when he was short with the judge. However, he made derogatory remarks to the Dispatch reporter and photographer and repeatedly and covertly gave the middle finger.

After the hearing was finished, Deputy District Attorney Mark Hood and Bullock’s attorney, Tim Fukai, spent about 30 minutes talking with the owner of Indian-Victory Motorcycles in a private conference room. Neither the owner nor Hood would comment on the meeting.

The three weeks of extra time were not necessary – all parties were ready for trial – but will be useful, said Eben Kurtzman, Collier’s attorney.

“You always use the time you have between dates to investigate,” he said.

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