Cirque Du Soleil’s ‘OVO’ captures the imagination

'Ants' rotate slices of Kiwi during a performance of 'OVO'.

Cirque du Soleil’s

OVO

has arrived in San Jose just in time. Come enter another
dimension! Experience the unique! Become enchanted!
From the moment you enter the blue and gold tent, you feel the
anticipation of going on an exciting journey into a surreal world
of insects.
Cirque du Soleil’s “OVO” has arrived in San Jose just in time. Come enter another dimension! Experience the unique! Become enchanted!

From the moment you enter the blue and gold tent, you feel the anticipation of going on an exciting journey into a surreal world of insects.

By the time all are seated, the tent flaps shut and the lights dim, there is a feeling of preparedness for an exciting adventure – and what an adventure!

This year’s Montreal-based production is called “OVO” (which means egg in Portuguese) and takes place in a state-of-the-art climate-controlled, blue and gold big top in San Jose. It was custom designed in France and comfortably holds 2,500 people.

Your senses are bombarded with a kaleidoscope and cacophony of mind-enhancing color, movement and sound that are completely unique, new and enchanting.

The “Cirque” does not have animals doing things they really don’t want to do. Instead there are a lot of people doing wonderful things – some of which you have never seen before.

Some are doing things we have seen before with a type of panache that brings up the old adage, “It’s not what you do but how you do it.”

The performers project that they are having a great time. The feeling is transmitted to the audience as they glide, balance, fly, defy gravity and turn themselves inside out and right side up with (that old circus cliche) the greatest of ease.

Brazilian born director/ choreographer Deborah Colker brings this piece of glorious art to reality with unbounded imagination and creativity. She has the distinction to be the first woman to direct a Cirque du Soleil production in its 26-year history.

The production is seamless; every act is choreographed to blend with what has gone before.

Every move has been detailed to fit into the ingeniously designed set as an integral part of the production. The cast consists of 54 performing artists from 13 countries.

In “OVO”, the marvelous world of insects appears big as life, and we see a day of their energetic lives. Don’t bother to try and figure it out until you have a few days to digest this whole experience.

By then you won’t care. You will just remember the experience. The inoffensive comedy flavor runs throughout.

For the most part, the funny, relaxing moments allow you to catch your breath between breathtaking feats. An essence of sensuality is scattered here and there – just enough to be in good taste.

The costumes are outstanding as usual, but the production’s skin-tight wardrobes are stunning and sometimes wonderfully outlandish. Costume designer Liz Vandal has literally gone “over the top,” constructing stunning, outrageous, recognizable insects that delight.

The original score by composer and musical director Berna Ceppas combines actual insect sounds with the music directly from the keyboard. The track features a lot of percussion, and an amped violin makes the sounds more intriguing.

There is only one problem with this Cirque du Soleil: you might not want to return to reality. But it’s worth the risk. This is Cirque du Soleil at its finest.

***

‘Cirque Du Soleil’

Where: Under the Grand Chapiteau – the blue-and yellow-big top at the Taylor Street Bridge in San Jose

Through: March 7

Details: (800) 450-1480 or www.cirquedusoleil.com

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