Question on market signs

 


I’m calling in regard to the Gavilan Market. They have more than
15 ads on the outside walls of their building for alcohol. I don’t
think the ads are legal because of the signage. Can you check and
see if they can be corrected?

“I’m calling in regard to the Gavilan Market. They have more than 15 ads on the outside walls of their building for alcohol. I don’t think the ads are legal because of the signage. Can you check and see if they can be corrected?”

Red Phone: Dear Don’t Sign Me Up, Code Enforcement Officer Scott Barron said he thought the signs would not comply with the city’s Zoning Ordinance but would need to take a look at it further to determine what, if anything, should be done.

The city requires permits for all signs placed up in commercial and industrial districts. The signs allowed are based on the size of the building and the area, Barron said. Some temporary signs and banners don’t need permits, such as those advertising a grand opening or special sale. In those cases, the store can only have three signs and they can only be up for 30 days.

Pajamas don’t belong in public

“I have a big pet peeve that is driving me crazy. I hate seeing all these women – and a few men – with pajamas in the store. What the heck is their problem? I know with a lot of it has to do with laziness. Can’t they get it together and stop looking like little slobs?”

Red Phone: Dear Keep Them Home, Red Phone couldn’t agree more. Maybe we could follow the trend set by Shanghai, China. According to the South China Morning Post, the city’s Qiba neighborhood “has mobilized neighborhood committee officials and volunteers since July to talk people out of the habit of wearing pajamas in public.” Even better yet, how about an ordinance?

Leave your comments