FOOTBALL: Committee seeks funds for Anzar football

 

In an effort to field a football team by fall 2011, as well as
remain cost neutral to the Aromas-San Juan Unified School District,
a new fundraising committee at Anzar High School is seeking
approximately $25,000 for initial start-up costs by December of
this year.
In an effort to field a football team by fall 2011, as well as remain cost neutral to the Aromas-San Juan Unified School District, a new fundraising committee at Anzar High School is seeking approximately $25,000 for initial start-up costs by December of this year.

The Football Fundraising Committee, which is headed by chairman David G. Moore and was established in recent months after a separate committee found student interest in football to be high, is focusing on community members and local businesses to make pledges to a football program at Anzar, which would be a first for the San Juan Bautista high school.

“That initial capital is to get the program up and running,” said Moore, who added that the start-up costs are based on figures provided by Marina High School ($23,338) and Trinity Christian High School ($22,725) of Monterey, each of which established an 8-man football team with similar funds in recent years.

In fact, Marina and Trinity, along with Anchorpoint Christian High School in Gilroy, were the first three teams in the 8-man Coastal Athletic League in 2007-08, although Marina has since graduated to 11-man football in the Mission Trail Athletic League.

The CAL, however, has since grown to include Crystal Springs Uplands in Hillsborough, Woodside Priory in Portola Valley and Pinewood School in Los Altos.

With the right amount of money, Anzar High School could join the Coastal Athletic League next fall.

“Right now, the effort is focused on community members and community businesses who have a tie to the San Juan Valley,” Moore said. A statement issued by the committee earlier this month said that donors, if desired, would receive an advertisement sign that would be placed near the Anzar football field.

The initial $25,000 price tag would help pay for uniforms, helmets and other equipment for the team, as well as help pay for coaches stipends, referees and league dues, which were just some of the initial expenses listed by Marina and Trinity Christian.

Anzar already boasts a football field, equipped with goal posts and an electronic scoreboard, thanks to the San Benito Cardinals of American Youth Football and Cheer.

In order to remain cost neutral, though, Moore foresees an established football program costing roughly $15,000 a year, although sustainability of the program could be funded through more traditional efforts, like raffles, gate receipts, concession sales, car washes and barbecue fundraisers.

The initial start-up cost has to be met first, though.

“What were doing right now, we’re looking for pledges,” said Moore, who noted that other traditional fundraising efforts would not be feasible, especially if the committee is unable to reach its $25,000 goal.

“Assuming we get to that hurdle, then we’ll know what we can do moving forward,” added Moore, who is optimistic the committee will reach its goals. “From a logical standpoint, we want to make sure if we’re going to instate football for fall ’11 … we want to generally know where we’re at.”

Moore, whose committee includes Cathy Alameda, Anthony Botelho, Dan De Vries, Willard McCabe, Mike McKinney, Joyce Medeiros, Andrew Moore and Mark Moreno, also chaired the Football Advisory Committee, which earlier this year concluded interest in football was high among surveyed students at Aromas School, San Juan School and Anzar High School. The fall sport was voted as the No. 1 selection in two different surveys — a student-interest survey geared toward potential players and fans that included several general sport options, as well as a second survey that listed only fall sport options.

Currently, Anzar only offers girls volleyball and coed cross country during the fall months, which has led to lower participation numbers among male students at Anzar, a school of roughly 400 students.

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