School board opposes Proposition 19

Trustee Denise Apuzzo cast the one dissenting vote.

After tweaking a

factually inaccurate

resolution brought to them by the school district at the urging
of a local anti-marijuana activist, the school board voted 6-1 to
state their opposition to Proposition 19.
After tweaking a “factually inaccurate” resolution brought to them by the school district at the urging of a local anti-marijuana activist, the school board voted 6-1 to state their opposition to Proposition 19.

The resolution opposes the November ballot initiative, which would legalize marijuana in California.

Student board representative Katharine Bright also voted in favor of the resolution. Trustee Denise Apuzzo cast the one dissenting vote.

“This has nothing to do with my personal opinion – that’s between me and the ballot box,” Apuzzo said. “I just feel it’s not our place.”

According to the ballot measure, adults 21 or older may possess, cultivate or transport marijuana for personal use. Ron Kirkish, a community activist who has campaigned against the legalization of marijuana, among other causes, spoke out at the board meeting against Proposition 19.

By passing the resolution, the board would “send a signal to our kids and our parents that we are serious about drugs in our schools,” Kirkish said.

However, the text of the ballot measure explicitly states the proposition “prohibits people from possessing marijuana on school grounds, using in public, or smoking it while minors are present.”

Trustee Mark Good pointed this out, saying that the resolution – which stated that “Proposition 19 would permit possession of cannabis on school property” – was “factually inaccurate.” He urged his colleagues to take a closer look at the resolution before casting their vote.

“I can’t support something that’s absolutely wrong,” Good said. “If this does move forward, I would at least like the board to vote on something that’s not a lie.”

With Good’s help, the board struck the inaccurate statement from the resolution and cast their votes.

“It sends a message,” said trustee Fred Tovar. “We have a no-tolerance policy for drugs.”

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