Drowning goose resuscitated

Drowning goose resuscitated

Equipped with a resuscitation device designed specifically for
animals in distress, the city’s animal control officer rescued a
drowning goose at the community park, police said.
Equipped with a resuscitation device designed specifically for animals in distress, the city’s animal control officer rescued a drowning goose at the community park, police said.

Though the animal died after being taken to a veterinary hospital, witnesses to the incident credit the officer’s use of the medical equipment for its brief revival from unconsciousness.

While on patrol at the city park on West Edmundson Avenue about 12:40 p.m. Thursday, Morgan Hill animal control officer Daniel Pina noticed three geese attempting to drown a smaller goose in the pond at the southern end of the property, according to police.

The threatened smaller goose was upside down with his head underwater when Pina noticed the attack, and he retrieved the animal from the pond using a catch pole, Sgt. Shane Palsgrove said.

Pina placed the goose on the shore and gave it small, quick chest compressions, Palsgrove said. The animal coughed up water and began to look around. Pina then carried the goose to his truck, and placed an artificial resuscitation device known as Air for Paws over the goose’s bill in an effort to fully revive it.

Within five minutes the goose picked up its head and tried to stand up, police said.

“It was really awesome to bring the goose back to life,” Pina said.

Geese fighting at the community park is a natural occurrence that happens every year during mating season, Pina explained. Male geese compete for dominance by killing off weaker males.

The goose was taken to the San Martin Veterinary Hospital where it was treated before it died over the weekend, according to Air for Paws owner Terry Moriyama.

Air for Paws, a nonprofit company, created and distributes the artificial resuscitation devices designed for animals. When operated correctly, the masks can stabilize a pet or animal that has suffered smoke inhalation, heart problems or other condition resulting in a lack of oxygen.

Despite the goose’s death following the near-drowning, Moriyama said she is “thrilled” that the Air for Paws kit helped the oxygen-deprived animal in an emergency.

“We didn’t really know if (the device) would work on a larger bird like this one, but it looks like it does,” Moriyama said.

According to Moriyama, the inhalation of the toxic water in the park pond likely contributed to the goose’s death.

Since the Thursday incident, Air for Paws has donated numerous animal resuscitation kits to fire departments in Hollister and Gilroy, and plans to donate more to the San Benito County department and CalFire, Moriyama said.

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