Community Pulse: Re-approving building projects

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Should the City Council require residential building projects
that have been on hold for more than one year to be formally
re-approved?
THIS WEEK’S WEB POLL:

Should the City Council require residential building projects that have been on hold for more than one year to be formally re-approved?

– Yes, they should repeat the process. The whole situation in the town will have changed in that year. I have long objected to builders assuming that permission once given lasts for eternity. A re-application gives the community a chance to consider whether that

project still fits our vision.

– Of course; here’s another way to stick the builders with more fees to feed city coffers!

– ABSOLUTELY NOT! Such an act would violate state and local law which vests rights to entitled property. If our city leaders can’t recognize the potential liability to which they may expose the residents of Gilroy, perhaps they should chat with their counterparts in Half Moon Bay who, by similar action, bankrupted their city to the tune of $30 million! Council should have been decisive and unambiguous rather than pandering to those repugnant few that choose to debase themselves to win at all costs.

-No. I could see perhaps the two- or three-year mark. The economy has had tremendous unforeseen consequences and we all need to be flexible.

– I do believe a re-approval should be needed, however, only nominal if any fees should be collected. We need our builders to build!

-No, not one year. As we have seen, economic times can force changes in a community. Perhaps there should be a limit, however, more like five years.

– Yes. Seems logical given how things change over a course of a year, and new restrictions or requirements could have been passed that may affect the previous plans.

– Yes! Some developers can hold on to their allotted RDO’s for forever it seems (Glen Loma). After a reasonable amount of time if they are not used they should be put back into the regular process so other developers will have a chance. Also, once the RDO’s are all gone for that time period, exemptions need to be limited so we stick to our Specific/General Plan of controlled growth. More consideration needs to be focused on the impact development has on our schools. Any big developments should include plans to mitigate school populations by building more schools or other ideas.

– No. Once it is approved, the project has the green light from the Council. It then becomes a process with city staff to be sure the plans, environmental impact, permits, construction inspections, etc. be followed.

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