Alejo bill apologizes to Filipino Americans

Luis Alejo

Assemblyman Luis Alejo’s office announced Monday the State
Assembly passed a bill he authored that is being referred to as
a

landmark resolution apologizing for nearly 100 years of
discrimination toward Filipinos and Filipino Americans,

according to a statement.
Assemblyman Luis Alejo’s office announced Monday the State Assembly passed a bill he authored that is being referred to as a “landmark resolution apologizing for nearly 100 years of discrimination toward Filipinos and Filipino Americans,” according to a statement.

The resolution will next head to the State Senate for a vote. Alejo, D-Watsonville, noted it marks the first time the state “has expressly apologized to Filipino Americans” for violating civil liberties and constitutional rights.

Alejo’s released the following statement:

“Sharply repudiating the shameful treatment Filipinos received, particularly in the 1920s and 1930s, ACR 74 details numerous governmental policies and laws that targeted Filipino Americans. During this period, school segregation and anti-miscegenation laws were the norm, as were tight quotas on Filipino immigration, even though the Philippines was under the sovereignty of the United States until the end of World War II.

Locally, tensions boiled over and led to the “Watsonville anti-Filipino riots” of 1930, which resulted in the death of Filipino laborer Fermin Tobera. The riots soon spread to other cities including Salinas, San Jose, San Francisco, and Stockton.”

The full text of ACR 74 can be found at www.leginfo.ca.gov.

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