South San Jose mosquitoes test positive for West Nile Virus

South San Jose mosquitoes test positive for West Nile Virus

The Santa Clara County Vector Control District confirmed Friday
that adult mosquitoes collected from South San Jose tested positive
for West Nile Virus, according to a press release sent by the
SSVCD.
The Santa Clara County Vector Control District confirmed Friday that adult mosquitoes collected from South San Jose tested positive for West Nile Virus, according to a press release sent by the SSVCD.

The detection has prompted the scheduling of a mosquito fogging treatment at 11 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 14 in the surrounding area to prevent human cases of the disease.

Acting District Manager Russ Parman notes that “West Nile Virus continues to be active in mosquitoes in the south San Jose area, so it is important to keep the numbers of mosquitoes as low as possible.”

The SSVCD press release estimates 1 to 3 percent of the mosquitoes in south San Jose are carrying WNV.

The region scheduled to receive fogging treatment is bordered by Hillsdale Avenue on the north; Pearl Avenue, Kenton Lane, Glenmont Drive, and Windfield Boulevard on the west; Monterey Avenue, Apple Blossom Drive, Lean Avenue, and Dunn Avenue on the east; Curie Drive and Foothill Drive on the south, according to the press release.

As an added convenience, staff from the SSVCD and the Public Health Department will be available during extended hours from 7:30 a.m. to 7 p.m., Sept. 13-14, via a dedicated phone line/voicemail at 1-800-314-2427.

Transmitted by mosquito bites, WNV causes mild to severe flu-like symptoms such as fever, headache, body aches, and, in severe cases, significant neurological damage or even death, according to the press release, which warns the elderly and those with compromised immune systems are most susceptible.

Since the arrival of WNV in California in 2003, the SSVCD states 3,021 people across California have contracted the disease.

As dead birds may also indicate the presence of WNV, the SSVCD asks Santa Clara County residents to report crows, jays, or birds of prey that have been dead for less than 48 hours and do not appear to have died because of an injury. People who find such birds should call the State of California WNV hotline at 877-WNV-BIRD (2473) or click here: Info

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