11-year-old takes on writing about the importance of music programs in our public schools

Dear Editor:
My 11-year-old son Michael Ventura wrote the attached essay for
one of his classes at school. After several people read it they
suggested that I send it to you and ask you to print it in The
Dispatch.
Dear Editor:

My 11-year-old son Michael Ventura wrote the attached essay for one of his classes at school. After several people read it they suggested that I send it to you and ask you to print it in The Dispatch. They felt that more people should hear from a child’s point of view, what music programs in schools does for kids. They felt that Michael did a great job explaining what the violin means and does for him.

Maria Ventura

Have you ever played an instrument? If you have, you probably know how hard, yet rewarding it is. Some schools are ceasing to fund musical programs. Everyone I know that plays music is quick at learning everything they are taught. Music should be available in schools and funded, as opposed to unavailable and unfunded.

People might think music is a waste of time, and kids could be doing something more worthwhile and educational in their spare time than practicing an instrument. Actually, you can really learn a lot from being involved in music. Math is one of the examples I can think of, like fractions and patterns. Moving your arms, fingers, sometimes feet, and other parts of your body, as well as thinking at the same time are things you learn how to do while playing an instrument. Sometimes people who try hard can join a tour group and learn history about places all over the world. Music teaches us many things.

Another thing music teaches us is how to be responsible. You have to practice a lot and go to concerts if you want to stay in the group you are in. Extra practices are also sometimes scheduled so kids can learn to manage their time wisely. Some people just don’t want to work hard, so they don’t get any more responsible. With that being said, music not only teaches responsibility, but flexibility with a schedule.

Music gives you a mixed feeling of bliss and accomplishment, every time you learn something new, it boosts your self-esteem. Kids do drugs mostly to fit in or look cool, but while you’re doing it, you look anything but cool. In music programs you get so caught up in playing music, you don’t feel the need to do drugs. People who join gangs, join gangs because they feel lonely, but you can make friends with people in the program. Without music programs, people could be lonely or depressed, but if you enforce music, that might not happen.

Music can improve a persons intelligence, responsibility, and self-esteem.

Sign petitions, start petitions, or do anything you can do to keep music programs available for kids in schools. I can’t speak from other people, all I can do is speak from my own experience and ask you to do everything you can to keep music available in schools for everyone.

Michael Ventura, Gilroy

Submitted Friday, June 13

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